Òṣèlú aláwùjọ

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Òṣèlú aláwùjọ is a political ideology that considers itself to be a form of reformist democratic socialism.[1] Social democracy argues that all citizens should be legally entitled to certain social rights. These are made up of universal access to public services such as: education, health care, workers' compensation, and other services including child care and care for the elderly.[2] Social democracy is connected with the trade union labour movement and supports collective bargaining rights for workers.[3] Contemporary social democracy advocates freedom from discrimination based on differences of: ability/disability, age, social class, ethnicity, gender, language, race, religion, and sexual orientation.[4] Most social democratic parties are affiliated with the Socialist International.[5]



Ìtọ́kasí[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

  1. Donald F. Busky. Democratic Socialism: A Global Survey. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc., 2000. Pp. 8. (The Frankfurt Declaration of the Socialist International, which almost all social democratic parties are members of, declares the goal of the development of democratic socialism.)
  2. Thomas Meyer, Lewis P. Hinchman. The theory of social democracy. Cambridge, England, UK; Malden, Massachusetts, USA: Polity Press, 2007. Pp. 137.
  3. Martin Upchurch, Graham John Taylor, Andy Mathers. The crisis of social democratic trade unionism in Western Europe: the search for alternatives. Surrey, England, UK; Burlington, Vermont, USA: Ashgate Publishing, 2009. Pp. 51.
  4. Susan L. Groenke. Critical Pedagogy and Teacher Education in the Neoliberal Era: Small Openings. Springer, 2009. Pp. 192.
  5. Donald F. Busky. Democratic Socialism: A Global Survey. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc., 2000. Pp. 8.