Ife Ẹ̀yẹ Àgbáyé FIFA 2010

Lát'ọwọ́ Wikipedia, ìwé ìmọ̀ ọ̀fẹ́
Lọ sí: atọ́ka, àwárí
Ife Ẹ̀yẹ Àgbáyé FIFA 2010
South Africa 2010

2010 FIFA World Cup official logo
Tournament details
Host country  South Africa
Àwọn ọjọ́ 11 June – 11 July (31 days)
Àwọn ẹgbẹ́ 32 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s) 10 (in 9 host cities)
Final positions
Champions  Spéìn (1st title)
Runner-up  Nẹ́dálándì
Third place  Jẹ́mánì
Fourth place  Urugúáì
Tournament statistics
Matches played 64
Goals scored 145 (2.27 per match)
Attendance 3,178,856 (49,670 per match)
Top scorer(s) Urugúáì Diego Forlán
Jẹ́mánì Thomas Müller
Nẹ́dálándì Wesley Sneijder
Spéìn David Villa
(5 goals)[1]
Best player Urugúáì Diego Forlán[2]
2006
2014

Ife Ẹ̀yẹ Àgbáyé FIFA 2010 ni Ife Eye Agbaye FIFA kokandinlogun, idije agbaye fun egbe agbaboolu orile-ede awon okunrin. O waye ni Guusu Afrika lati ojo 11 Osu Kefa de ojo 11 Osu Keje 2010. Awon orile-ede Afrika nikan ni won ni aye lati du igbalejo re; ni 2004, FIFA yan orile-ede Guusu Afrika koja Egypt ati Morocco lati di orile-ede Afrika akoko ti yio gbalejo idije na.

Gbogbo ayo sele ni papa ereidaraya mewa ni ilu mesan kakiri orile-ede na, ayo iwasopin waye ni papa ereidaraya Soccer City ni Johannesburg. Awon egbe agbaboolu mejilelogbon ni won kopa leyin ti won ti yori ninu àwon idije ikopa to bere ni Osu Kejo 2007. Ninu ere ayo akoko idije na, awon egbe agbaboolu kookan dije ninu adipo ifigagbaga larin awon egbe agbaboolu merin fun ipo, awon egbe agbaboolu meji ti won lewaju ninu won ni won tesiwaju. Awon egbe agbaboolu merindinlogun yi tesiwaju ninu idije pami-nku, nibi ere ayo pami-nku igba meta fa awon egbe agbaboolu meji ti won kopa ninu ayo amuwasopin wa.

Ninu ayo iwasopin, orile-ede Spein, to je aboriidije Europe, bori orile-ede Nedalandi pelu gol 1–0 leyin asiko afikun, Andrés Iniesta lo ju gol wole ni iseju 116k lati fun Spein ni ife-eye agbaye akoko re, o di orile-ede ekejo ti yio gba ife-eye na ati orile-ede Europe akoko ti yio gba ni eyin odi orile Europe. Guusu Afrika to gbalejo, world champions Italia to je aboriidije ni 2006 ati Fransi to gba ipo keji ni 2006, ni gbogbo won je kikolese lati inu awon ere ayo ayikan akoko idije na. Igba akoko nu ti orile-ede agbalejo je kikolese lati inu ere ayo ayikan akoko.

Iyan agbalejo[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Africa was chosen as the host for the 2010 World Cup as part of a short-lived policy, abandoned in 2007,[3] to rotate the event among football confederations. Five African nations placed bids to host the 2010 World Cup: Egypt, Morocco, South Africa and a joint bid from Libya and Tunisia.

Following the decision of the FIFA Executive Committee not to allow co-hosted tournaments, Tunisia withdrew from the bidding process. The committee also decided not to consider Libya's solo bid as it no longer met all the stipulations laid down in the official List of Requirements.

The winning bid was announced by FIFA president Sepp Blatter at a media conference on 15 May 2004 in Zürich; in the first round of voting South Africa received 14 votes, Morocco received 10 votes and Egypt no votes. South Africa, which had narrowly failed to win the right to host the 2006 event, was thus awarded the right to host the tournament.[4]

During 2006 and 2007, rumours circulated in various news sources that the 2010 World Cup could be moved to another country.[5][6] Franz Beckenbauer, Horst R. Schmidt and, reportedly, some FIFA executives, expressed concern over the planning, organisation, and pace of South Africa's preparations.[5][7] FIFA officials repeatedly expressed their confidence in South Africa as host, stating that a contingency plan existed only to cover natural catastrophes, as had been in place at previous FIFA World Cups.[8]

Àwọn ayò ìkópa[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

The qualification draw for the 2010 World Cup was held in Durban on 25 November 2007. As the host nation, South Africa qualified automatically for the tournament. As happened in the previous tournament, the defending champions were not given an automatic berth, and Italy had to participate in qualification. With a pool of entrants comprising 204 of the 208 FIFA national teams at the time, the 2010 World Cup shares with the 2008 Summer Olympics the record for most competing nations in a sporting event.

Some controversies took place during the qualifications. In the second leg of the play-off between France and the Republic of Ireland, French captain Thierry Henry, unseen by the referee, handled the ball in the lead up to a late goal, which enabled France to qualify ahead of Ireland, sparking widespread controversy and debate. FIFA rejected a request from the Football Association of Ireland to replay the match,[9] and Ireland later withdrew a request to be included as an unprecedented 33rd World Cup entrant.[10][11] As a result, FIFA announced a review into the use of technology or extra officials at the highest level, but decided against the widely expected fast-tracking of goal-line referee's assistants for the South African tournament.[12]

People watching the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, with vuvuzelas.

Costa Rica complained over Uruguay's winning goal in the CONMEBOL–CONCACAF playoff,[13] while Egypt and Algeria's November 2009 matches were surrounded by reports of crowd trouble. On the subject of fair play, FIFA President Sepp Blatter said: Àdàkọ:Quote

The 2010 tournament was the first World Cup not to feature any team making its debut appearance (Slovakia had not previously appeared under that name, but is considered by FIFA to be a continuation of the Czechoslovakia team that last played in the 1990 tournament). North Korea qualified for the first time since 1966; Honduras and New Zealand were both making their first appearances since 1982, and Algeria were at the Finals for the first time since the 1986 competition.

Àtòjọ àwọn ẹgbẹ́ agbábọ́ọ̀lù tó yọrí láti kópa[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Awon egbe agbaboolu, pelu ip won ki idije o to bere,[14] ni won yori lati kopa ninu idije na.

AFC (4)
CAF (6)
CONCACAF (3)
CONMEBOL (5)
OFC (1)
UEFA (13)


     Àwọn orílẹ̀-èdè tí wọ́n yọrí láti kópa nínú Ife Ẹ̀yẹ Àgbáyé      Àwọn orílẹ̀-èdè tí wọ́n kùnà láti kópa      Àwọn orílẹ̀-èdè tí wọ́n kò kópa nínú Ife Ẹ̀yẹ Àgbáyé      Àwọn orílẹ̀-èdè tí wọn kì í ṣe ọmọẹgbẹ́ FIFA

Ìmúra[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Five new stadiums were built for the tournament, and five of the existing venues were upgraded. Construction costs were expected to be R8.4 billion (just over US$1 billion or €950 million).[15]

South Africa also improved its public transport infrastructure within the host cities, including Johannesburg's Gautrain and other metro systems, and major road networks were improved.[16] In March 2009, Danny Jordaan, the president of the 2010 World Cup organising committee, reported that all stadiums for the tournament were on schedule to be completed within six months.[17]

The country implemented special measures to ensure the safety and security of spectators in accordance with standard FIFA requirements,[18] including a temporary restriction of flight operation in the airspace surrounding the stadiums.[19]

At a ceremony to mark 100 days before the event, FIFA president Sepp Blatter praised the readiness of the country for the event.[20]

Construction strike[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

On 8 July 2009, 70,000 construction workers[21] who were working on the new stadiums walked off their jobs.[22] The majority of the workers receive R2500 per month (about £192, €224 or US$313), but the unions alleged that some workers were grossly underpaid. A spokesperson for the National Union of Mineworkers said to the SABC that the "no work no pay" strike would go on until FIFA assessed penalties on the organisers. Other unions threatened to strike into 2011.[23][24] The strike was swiftly resolved and workers were back at work within a week of it starting. There were no further strikes and all stadiums and construction projects were completed in time for the kick off.[25]

Ẹ̀bùn owó[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

The total prize money on offer for the tournament was confirmed by FIFA as US$420 million (including payments of US$40 million to domestic clubs), a 60 percent increase on the 2006 tournament.[26] Before the tournament, each of the 32 entrants received US$1 million for preparation costs. Once at the tournament, the prize money was distributed as follows:[26]

In a first for the World Cup, FIFA made payments to the domestic clubs of the players representing their national teams at the tournament. This saw a total of US$40 million paid to domestic clubs. This was the result of an agreement reached in 2008 between FIFA and European clubs to disband the G-14 group and drop their claims for compensation dating back to 2005 over the financial cost of injuries sustained to their players while on international duty, such as that from Belgian club Charleroi S.C. for injury to Morocco's Abdelmajid Oulmers in a friendly game in 2004, and from English club Newcastle United for an injury to England's Michael Owen in the 2006 World Cup.[27][28][29]


Àwọn ibi eréìdárayá[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Johannesburg Durban Cape Town Johannesburg
Soccer City [30] Pápá Eréìdárayá Moses Mabhida1 Pápá Eréìdárayá Cape Town2 Pápá Eréìdárayá Ellis Park
26°14′5.27″S 27°58′56.47″E / 26.2347972°S 27.9823528°E / -26.2347972; 27.9823528 (Soccer City) 29°49′46″S 31°01′49″E / 29.82944°S 31.03028°E / -29.82944; 31.03028 (Moses Mabhida Stadium) 33°54′12.46″S 18°24′40.15″E / 33.9034611°S 18.4111528°E / -33.9034611; 18.4111528 (Cape Town Stadium) 26°11′51.07″S 28°3′38.76″E / 26.1975194°S 28.0607667°E / -26.1975194; 28.0607667 (Ellis Park Stadium)
Àyè: 88,460 Àyè: 62,760 Àyè: 64,100 Àyè: 55,686
Pretoria Port Elizabeth
Pápá Eréìdárayá Loftus Versfeld Pápá Eréìdárayá Etíomi Nelson Mandela
25°45′12″S 28°13′22″E / 25.75333°S 28.22278°E / -25.75333; 28.22278 (Loftus Versfeld Stadium) 33°56′16″S 25°35′56″E / 33.93778°S 25.59889°E / -33.93778; 25.59889 (Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium)
Àyè: 42,858 Àyè: 42,486
Loftus Versfeld Stadium.jpg
Bloemfontein Polokwane Rustenburg Nelspruit
29°07′02.25″S 26°12′31.85″E / 29.1172917°S 26.2088472°E / -29.1172917; 26.2088472 (Free State Stadium) 23°55′29″S 29°28′08″E / 23.924689°S 29.468765°E / -23.924689; 29.468765 (Peter Mokaba Stadium) 25°34′43″S 27°09′39″E / 25.5786°S 27.1607°E / -25.5786; 27.1607 (Royal Bafokeng Stadium) 25°27′42″S 30°55′47″E / 25.46172°S 30.929689°E / -25.46172; 30.929689 (Mbombela Stadium)
Pápá Eréìdárayá Free State Pápá Eréìdárayá Peter Mokaba Pápá Eréìdárayá Royal Bafokeng Pápá Eréìdárayá Mbombela
Àyè: 40,911 Àyè: 41,733 Àyè: 38,646 Àyè: 40,929
  • ^1 As Durban Stadium
  • ^2 As Green Point Stadium


The following stadiums have all been upgraded to meet FIFA specification.

Awon ere ayo ayikan adipo[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

The first round, or group stage, saw the thirty-two teams divided into eight groups of four teams. Each group was a round-robin of six games, where each team played one match against each of the other teams in the same group. Teams were awarded three points for a win, one point for a draw and none for a defeat. The teams finishing first and second in each group qualified for the Round of 16.

The South American teams performed strongly, with all five advancing to the knockout stages (four as group winners). The overall performance of African teams on the first occasion that the continent hosted the event was judged disappointing by observers such as Cameroon great Roger Milla.[36] Of the six African nations only three won any matches, and only one (Ghana) progressed out of the first round.

Only six out of thirteen UEFA teams progressed to the last sixteen, a record low since the round of 16 was adopted in 1986.[37] Both of the finalists from the preceding tournament, France and Italy, were eliminated in the initial stage of the competition, the first time this has happened at a World Cup.[38] New Zealand ended the tournament as the only undefeated team after drawing their three group matches, but they finished behind Paraguay and Slovakia and were eliminated.

     Champion      Runner-up      Third place      Fourth place      Quarter-finals      Round of 16      Group stage
Tie-breaking criteria

Teams were ranked on the following criteria:[39]

1. Greater number of points in all group matches
2. Goal difference in all group matches
3. Greater number of goals scored in all group matches
4. Greatest number of points in matches between tied teams
5. Goal difference in matches between tied teams
6. Greatest number of goals scored in matches between tied teams
7. Drawing of lots by the FIFA Organising Committee
Key to colours in group tables
Teams that advanced to the round of 16

Àdìpọ̀ A[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Urugúáì 3 2 1 0 4 0 +4 7
 Mẹ́ksíkò 3 1 1 1 3 2 +1 4
 Gúúsù Áfríkà 3 1 1 1 3 5 −2 4
 Fránsì 3 0 1 2 1 4 −3 1



11 June 2010
Gúúsù Áfríkà  1–1  Mẹ́ksíkò Soccer City, Johannesburg
Urugúáì  0–0  Fránsì Cape Town Stadium, Cape Town
16 June 2010
Gúúsù Áfríkà  0–3  Urugúáì Loftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria
17 June 2010
Fránsì  0–2  Mẹ́ksíkò Peter Mokaba Stadium, Polokwane
22 June 2010
Mẹ́ksíkò  0–1  Urugúáì Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
Fránsì  1–2  Gúúsù Áfríkà Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein

Àdìpọ̀ B[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Argẹntínà 3 3 0 0 7 1 +6 9
 Kòréà Gúúsù 3 1 1 1 5 6 −1 4
 Gríìsì 3 1 0 2 2 5 −3 3
 Nàìjíríà 3 0 1 2 3 5 −2 1


12 June 2010
Kòréà Gúúsù  2–0  Gríìsì Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
Argẹntínà  1–0  Nàìjíríà Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg
17 June 2010
Argẹntínà  4–1  Kòréà Gúúsù Soccer City, Johannesburg
Gríìsì  2–1  Nàìjíríà Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein
22 June 2010
Nàìjíríà  2–2  Kòréà Gúúsù Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
Gríìsì  0–2  Argẹntínà Peter Mokaba Stadium, Polokwane

Àdìpọ̀ C[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Àwọn Ìpínlẹ̀ Aṣọ̀kan 3 1 2 0 4 3 +1 5
 Ilẹ̀gẹ̀ẹ́sì 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1 5
 Sloféníà 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
 Àlgéríà 3 0 1 2 0 2 −2 1


12 June 2010
Ilẹ̀gẹ̀ẹ́sì  1–1  Àwọn Ìpínlẹ̀ Aṣọ̀kan Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
13 June 2010
Àlgéríà  0–1  Sloféníà Peter Mokaba Stadium, Polokwane
18 June 2010
Sloféníà  2–2  Àwọn Ìpínlẹ̀ Aṣọ̀kan Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg
Ilẹ̀gẹ̀ẹ́sì  0–0  Àlgéríà Cape Town Stadium, Cape Town
23 June 2010
Sloféníà  0–1  Ilẹ̀gẹ̀ẹ́sì Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
Àwọn Ìpínlẹ̀ Aṣọ̀kan  1–0  Àlgéríà Loftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria

Àdìpọ̀ D[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Jẹ́mánì 3 2 0 1 5 1 +4 6
 Ghánà 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 4
 Austrálíà 3 1 1 1 3 6 −3 4
 Sérbíà 3 1 0 2 2 3 −1 3


13 June 2010
Sérbíà  0–1  Ghánà Loftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria
Jẹ́mánì  4–0  Austrálíà Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
18 June 2010
Jẹ́mánì  0–1  Sérbíà Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
19 June 2010
Ghánà  1–1  Austrálíà Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
23 June 2010
Ghánà  0–1  Jẹ́mánì Soccer City, Johannesburg
Austrálíà  2–1  Sérbíà Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit

Àdìpọ̀ E[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Nẹ́dálándì 3 3 0 0 5 1 +4 9
 Japan 3 2 0 1 4 2 +2 6
 Dẹ́nmárkì 3 1 0 2 3 6 −3 3
 Kamẹrúùn 3 0 0 3 2 5 −3 0


14 June 2010
Nẹ́dálándì  2–0  Dẹ́nmárkì Soccer City, Johannesburg
Japan  1–0  Kamẹrúùn Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein
19 June 2010
Nẹ́dálándì  1–0  Japan Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
Kamẹrúùn  1–2  Dẹ́nmárkì Loftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria
24 June 2010
Dẹ́nmárkì  1–3  Japan Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
Kamẹrúùn  1–2  Nẹ́dálándì Cape Town Stadium, Cape Town

Àdìpọ̀ F[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Paragúáì 3 1 2 0 3 1 +2 5
 Slofákíà 3 1 1 1 4 5 −1 4
 New Zealand 3 0 3 0 2 2 0 3
 Itálíà 3 0 2 1 4 5 −1 2


14 June 2010
Itálíà  1–1  Paragúáì Cape Town Stadium, Cape Town
15 June 2010
New Zealand  1–1  Slofákíà Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
20 June 2010
Slofákíà  0–2  Paragúáì Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein
Itálíà  1–1  New Zealand Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
24 June 2010
Slofákíà  3–2  Itálíà Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg
Paragúáì  0–0  New Zealand Peter Mokaba Stadium, Polokwane

Àdìpọ̀ G[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Brasil 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3 7
 Pọ́rtúgàl 3 1 2 0 7 0 +7 5
 Côte d'Ivoire 3 1 1 1 4 3 +1 4
 Kòréà Àríwá 3 0 0 3 1 12 −11 0


15 June 2010
Côte d'Ivoire  0–0  Pọ́rtúgàl Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
Brasil  2–1  Kòréà Àríwá Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg
20 June 2010
Brasil  3–1  Côte d'Ivoire Soccer City, Johannesburg
21 June 2010
Pọ́rtúgàl  7–0  Kòréà Àríwá Cape Town Stadium, Cape Town
25 June 2010
Pọ́rtúgàl  0–0  Brasil Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
Kòréà Àríwá  0–3  Côte d'Ivoire Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit

Àdìpọ̀ H[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

Ẹgbẹ́
Ayò B D S GF GS IG Ip
 Spéìn 3 2 0 1 4 2 +2 6
 Tsílè 3 2 0 1 3 2 +1 6
 Swítsàlandì 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
 Họ̀ndúràs 3 0 1 2 0 3 −3 1


16 June 2010
Họ̀ndúràs  0–1  Tsílè Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
Spéìn  0–1  Swítsàlandì Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
21 June 2010
Tsílè  1–0  Swítsàlandì Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
Spéìn  2–0  Họ̀ndúràs Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg
25 June 2010
Tsílè  1–2  Spéìn Loftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria
Swítsàlandì  0–0  Họ̀ndúràs Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein



Itokasi[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

  1. "FIFA.com". FIFA.com. http://www.fifa.com/classicfootball/awards/golden/award=gsa/idcup=17/pastcupawards.html. Retrieved 16 November 2011. 
  2. (Golden Ball award)
  3. "FIFA end World Cup Rotation". Mail & Guardian Online. 29 October 2007. Archived from the original on 20 July 2010. http://za.mg.co.za/article/2007-10-29-fifa-end-world-cup-rotation-policy. Retrieved 20 June 2010. 
  4. "Host nation of 2010 FIFA World Cup – South Africa". FIFA. 15 May 2004. http://www.fifa.com/worldcup/archive/germany2006/news/newsid=25395.html. Retrieved 8 January 2006. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 Harding, Luke (12 June 2006). "Doubt over South Africa 2010". The Guardian (London). http://football.guardian.co.uk/worldcup2006/story/0,,1818166,00.html. Retrieved 29 August 2006. 
  6. Craig, Jermaine (3 July 2006). "Fifa denies SA may lose 2010 World Cup". The Star. Archived from the original on 27 August 2006. http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?click_id=19&art_id=vn20060703014312923C258638&set_id=. Retrieved 30 August 2006. 
  7. "Beckenbauer issues 2010 warning". BBC Sport. 20 September 2006. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/africa/5362504.stm. Retrieved 19 October 2006. 
  8. Yoong, Sean (8 May 2007). "FIFA says South Africa 'definitely' will host 2010 World Cup". Associated Press. http://sports.yahoo.com/sow/news;_ylt=Ah.1PkVLAGTpuoi3rG.VSMgmw7YF?slug=ap-fifa-wcup2010&prov=ap&type=lgns. Retrieved 15 May 2007. 
  9. "FIFA statement on FAI request". FIFA. 20 November 2009. Archived from the original on 20 November 2009. http://www.webcitation.org/5lQk0CY2L. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 
  10. "Blatter apologises over comments". Press Association. 2 December 2009. Archived from the original on 3 December 2009. http://www.webcitation.org/5lkd3iCqc. Retrieved 3 December 2009. 
  11. "FAI tries to set record straight". The Irish Times. 2 December 2009. Archived from the original on 3 December 2009. http://www.webcitation.org/5lkeAwkE8. Retrieved 3 December 2009. 
  12. "FIFA reject extra referees proposal". Press Association. 2 December 2009. Archived from the original on 3 December 2009. http://www.webcitation.org/5lkKZdcQw. Retrieved 3 December 2009. 
  13. Harris, Nick (1 December 2009). "Blatter: we need goal line officials at World Cup President urges change as Fifa considers Ireland's appeal to be '33rd nation' at finals". The Independent (London). Archived from the original on 5 December 2009. http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/internationals/blatter-we-need-goal-line-officials-at-world-cup-1831686.html. Retrieved 5 January 2010. 
  14. Rankings shown are those in May 2010, but the rankings used for selecting the seven non-host seeds were those of October 2009 FIFAÀdàkọ:Dead link
  15. "SA faces R8.4bn stadium bill". News24. 1 October 2006. Archived from the original on 22 October 2006. http://web.archive.org/web/20061022131341/http://www.news24.com/News24/Sport/Soccer/0,,2-9-840_2006517,00.html. Retrieved 13 October 2006. 
  16. "Joburg pursues bus rapid transit system in bid to ease gridlock by 2010". Engineering News (Creamer Media). 2 November 2007. Archived from the original on 7 December 2008. http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article.php?a_id=119725. Retrieved 2 November 2008. 
  17. "SA 2010 venues 'ready by October'". BBC Sport. 26 March 2009. Archived from the original on 27 March 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/africa/7966169.stm. Retrieved 26 March 2009. 
  18. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa Special Measures Act, 2006" (PDF). Republic of South Africa, Minister of Sport and Recreation – Online Government Gazette No. 28593. 10 March 2006. Archived from the original on 3 November 2006. http://web.archive.org/web/20061103065105/http://www.info.gov.za/gazette/bills/2006/b13-06.pdf. Retrieved 13 October 2006. 
  19. "Additional Aviation Coordination and Security measures during the 2010 World Cup". South African Civil Aviation Authority. 7 May 2009. http://www.caa.co.za/resource%20center/AIC'S/45-2.pdf. Retrieved 24 December 2009. 
  20. "SA marks 100 days to World Cup". Africa Review. 2 March 2010. http://www.africareview.com/News/SA%20marks%20100%20days%20to%20World%20Cup/-/825442/872036/-/fcqxfuz/-/index.html. Retrieved 14 March 2010.  Àdàkọ:Dead link
  21. BBC and SABC report 70,000 while the AP, quoting the South African Federation of Civil Engineering Contractors, says 11,000
  22. "World Cup construction workers strike in SAfrica". ESPN Soccernet. Associated Press. 8 July 2009. http://soccernet.espn.go.com/news/story?id=659780&sec=world&cc=5901. Retrieved 8 July 2009. 
  23. "NUM members working on 2010 stadiums ready for massive strike action". SABC News. SABC. 7 July 2009. http://www.sabcnews.com/portal/site/SABCNews/menuitem.5c4f8fe7ee929f602ea12ea1674daeb9/?vgnextoid=4159f0381c552210VgnVCM10000077d4ea9bRCRD&vgnextfmt=default&channelPath=Sport%20%3E%3E%20Soccer. Retrieved 8 July 2009. 
  24. "S Africa strike hits stadium work". BBC News. 8 July 2009. Archived from the original on 9 July 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8140433.stm. Retrieved 8 July 2009. 
  25. "2010 construction strike ends". Sapa. South African Government. 15 July 2009. http://www.sa2010.gov.za/en/node/2429. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  26. 26.0 26.1 "FIFA Executive Committee holds historic meeting in Robben Island". FIFA.com (FIFA). 3 December 2009. http://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/federation/releases/newsid=1143269.html. Retrieved 26 June 2010. 
  27. "Fifa are adding insult to injury". The Journal. 1 March 2007. http://www.journallive.co.uk/nufc/newcastle-united-news/2007/03/01/fifa-are-adding-insult-to-injury-61634-18690847/. Retrieved 3 July 2009. 
  28. "G14 starts legal fight with Fifa". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 6 September 2005. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/africa/4219244.stm. Retrieved 31 December 2009. 
  29. "G-14 football group is disbanded". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 15 February 2008. Archived from the original on 3 December 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/7247791.stm. Retrieved 31 December 2009. 
  30. http://www.fifa.com/worldcup/destination/stadiums/stadium=5007759/index.html
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 31.3 31.4 31.5 "Venues". joburg.org.za. http://www.joburg.org.za/content/view/1030/244/. Retrieved 8 March 2010. 
  32. "Training Venues". nelsonmandelabay.gov.za. http://www.nelsonmandelabay.gov.za/FIFAWORLDCUP/Content.aspx?objID=32. Retrieved 19 March 2010. 
  33. 33.0 33.1 33.2 "2010 FIFA World Cup Programme Office". tshwane.gov.za. http://www.tshwane.gov.za/fifa_office.cfm. Retrieved 5 March 2010. 
  34. 34.0 34.1 "Durban – 2010 FIFA World Cup™ Host City". durban.gov.za. http://fifaworldcup.durban.gov.za/Pages/training_stadia.aspx. Retrieved 5 March 2010. 
  35. "Highlights 2010". sa2010.gov.za. http://www.sa2010.gov.za/highlights-2010. Retrieved 5 March 2010. 
  36. "Milla Disappointed With Africa". Soccer365.com. 9 July 2010. http://soccer365.com/world_cup/story_9710195414.php. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  37. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named South_Africa_2010_in_numbers
  38. "Champions Italy crash out of World Cup". CNN. 24 June 2010. http://edition.cnn.com/2010/SPORT/football/06/24/italy.slovakia.new.zealand.paraguay/index.html. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  39. "Fifa World Cup South Africa 2010 Regulations – Article 39.5" (PDF). FIFA. July 2007. http://www.fifa.com/mm/document/tournament/competition/fifa_wc_south_africa_2010_regulations_en_14123.pdf. Retrieved 1 December 2011.