Díámọ̀ndì

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Diamond
Seven clear faceted gems, six small stones of similar size and a large one.
A scattering of round-brilliant cut diamonds shows off the many reflecting facets.
General
CategoryNative Minerals
Chemical formulaC
Identification
Molar mass12.01 g·mol-1
ColorTypically yellow, brown or gray to colorless. Less often blue, green, black, translucent white, pink, violet, orange, purple and red.
Crystal habitOctahedral
Crystal systemIsometric-Hexoctahedral (Cubic)
Cleavage111 (perfect in four directions)
FractureConchoidal (shell-like)
Mohs scale hardness10
LusterAdamantine
Streakcolorless
DiaphaneityTransparent to subtransparent to translucent
Specific gravity3.52±0.01
Density3.5–3.53 g/cm3
Polish lusterAdamantine
Optical propertiesSingly Refractive
Refractive index2.418 (at 500 nm)
BirefringenceNone
PleochroismNone
Dispersion0.044
References[1][2]

In mineralogy, díámọ̀ndì (from the ancient Greek αδάμας – adámas "unbreakable") is an allotrope of carbon, where the carbon atoms are arranged in a variation of the face-centered cubic crystal structure called a diamond lattice. Diamond is less stable than graphite, but the conversion rate from diamond to graphite is negligible at ambient conditions. Diamond is renowned as a material with superlative physical qualities, most of which originate from the strong covalent bonding between its atoms. In particular, diamond has the highest hardness and thermal conductivity of any bulk material. Those properties determine the major industrial application of diamond in cutting and polishing tools and the scientific applications in diamond knives and diamond anvil cells.


Itokasi[àtúnṣe | àtúnṣe àmìọ̀rọ̀]

  1. Àṣìṣe ìtọ́kasí: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named mindat
  2. "Diamond". WebMineral. Retrieved 2009-07-07.